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Gold Fields looks to expand St Ives - National Mining Chronicle

Thursday, 5 January 2017

Gold Fields has pushed the button on plans to extend its 400,000 ounce a year St Ives gold mining operations near Kambalda in WA’s Goldfields to 2028.

The South African mining giant has lodged an application to the Environmental Protection Authority, released for public comment yesterday, that would increase its footprint in the district from 2061 hectares to more than 7000 hectares by 2028, including an extra 2000 hectares of disturbance on Lake Lefroy. 

The gold mining operation, which Gold Fields acquired in a $472 million deal from Western Mining Corporation to enter the Australian market in 2001, employs about 1000 people. 

It follows bullish talk from Gold Fields executives on the exploration upside of the 12 million ounce St Ives project, where reserves are predicted to run out in 2020, pledging to throw at least $37 million towards it from an Australian budget of $95 million this year.

The last significant development at St Ives was the decision to mine the multi-million ounce Invincible deposit from 2014 — now the core of the operation — with plans to go underground at the target later this year. Late last year, Gold Fields managing director Nick Holland promised to continue the splash over the next three to five years, with high-priority targets in the Speedway trend that feeds Invincible and 100km of paeleo-channels running along the St Ives tenements. 

Gold Fields also owns the Granny Smith gold mine near Laverton, the Agnew-Lawlers and Darlot mines near Leinster, and paid $350 million for a half-stake in Gold Road Resources’ 6.2 million ounce Gruyere Gold Project, 200km east of Laverton, in November. 

The Beyond 2018 proposal is open for public comment until Wednesday, January 11. 

It follows a statement from State Environment Minister Albert Jacob last week that the Gruyere joint venture may be implemented.

Image: The Lefroy mill at Gold Fields St Ives Kambalda operations. Picture: Kalgoorlie Miner.

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